2022 Lecture Topics

Each year the IDL presents a handful of topics to professional Architecture & Engineering firms. These topics cover a wide range of design and building applications such as energy modeling and daylighting. Topics are focused on helping a firm integrate energy efficiency practices into their projects and design process. Each presentation is about an hour with lunch provided. All in attendance will receive 1 AIA CEU as well as a certificate to verify attendance. The classes marked with (HSW) qualify for Health, Safety and Welfare credit. For a complete list of topics offered for lunch and learn visit idlboise.com If you are interested in scheduling one or two sessions for us to present at your firm you can fill out the form linked above or you may contact Dylan Agnes or Lyndsay Watkins. Thank you and we look forward to hearing from you.

Future of Lighting Controls

Description:

Although LEDs have shown, they are a big game changer in the commercial lighting realm; lower lighting power density is not the only area of value when considering lighting. We can further increase savings from these highly efficient lighting systems by introducing control systems that collect data and user input to create an evolving feedback loop that seeks peak system operation. While LLLC’s (Luminaire Level Lighting Control) use this feature, they still use the same infrastructure as the lighting and control system that have come before it, which can be a limitation for expanding the systems efficiency and integration to other building systems. We believe the internet of things (IoT) will change the lighting and controls industry, providing an excellent medium for an integrated, multi-service IoT platform. Why? Where there are people, there are lights; where there are people, there will also be the need for connectivity. New and connected lighting controls provide a means to deliver valuable IoT services and increased energy savings.

The Architect's Business Case For Energy Performance Modeling

Description:

Most of us think of energy modeling as an engineering exercise. The truth is that more models and simulations are performed, and to better result, if the architect understands when and how to support the process and how to utilize the output. A building energy model can provide the architect an iterative process to increase the real-world effectiveness of energy systems within a building. This session will explore the value-add of energy modeling from the architect’s perspective, providing a business case for more active involvement in avocation for energy performance modeling.

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